Editor’s Note: On Surfaces, Construction and Concealment

The fourteenth issue of Notes, due to be launched on Wednesday, is themed around surfaces, construction and concealment. It is the last issue of Michaelmas, and we are eagerly awaiting your response. In “Pop and Equality: on Andy Warhol and Steven Morrissey”, Daisy Churn discusses how constructed identities can be employed to conceal inequality. Kyung Oh explores, with melodious subtlety, the construction of literary character and identity in his poem “Criseyde”. The difference between creation and construction becomes apparent in Jamie Rycroft’s “Eva Araim”, employing images of childbirth. The adoption of a deliberately constructed identity for ourselves, and the imposing of constructions onto others is a timeless literary topic, particularly because any writer will construct, and ultimately always conceal, in the process of creating. Both Debahuti Chaliha, a writer from Perth, and Tam Blaxter, deal with this issue in their poems.

Surfaces are created in many ways throughout the issue – most notably the image of a droplet by Thomas Blunt, created using equations and computers. With this we hope to introduce Notes’ readers to a way of creating art that might be unfamiliar.

Notes’ final issue this Michaelmas encourages discussion about how we present ourselves and about the ultimate superficiality of both art and communication. Yet the issue is not constrained to this topic, and we are proud to present a very diverse collection of student art and thought. As always, we hope this magazine provides inspiration for future work and discussion. We look forward to hearing your thoughts on it, and seeing you at the launch on the twenty-seventh of November.

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